Acupuncture

The art of acupuncture originally developed in ancient China and spread to Japan and Korea (6th century), Vietnam (8th century) and eventually to Europe (16th century). It also has a long history in Tibet.    The 21st century has seen a massive dissemination of acupuncture knowledge and experience throughout the world. This has naturally lead to a vast array of theories and practices as the simple art of penetrating the human body with fine needles comes into contact with modern science.    Modern scientific research confirms that acupuncture:
            • has an anti-inflammatory effect (1) (2)
            • enhances immunity and cellular function (3) (4)
            • enhances blood circulation (5) (6)
            • generates higher levels of oxygenation and nutrition to cells and tissues (5) (6)
            • promotes more efficient elimination of carbon dioxide and reduces acidity (5) (6)
            • produces natural pain relief (7) (8)
            • enhances muscular relaxation (9)
 
(1) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1781596/
(2) http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1534735407305892
(3) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4540978/
(4) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3135660/
(5) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3388479/
(6) https://journals.lww.com/anesthesia-analgesia/Abstract/2007/02000/Acupuncture_Enhances_Generation_of_Nitric_Oxide.14.aspx
(7) https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/1357513
(8) https://www.rmit.edu.au/news/all-news/2017/jun/acupuncture-relieves-pain-emergency-patients
(9) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3388479/
(10) https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304395997001978